elements of permanent value

Andy Duncan, the Channel 4 chief executive says, "The established economic model is inevitably in decay. But, just as the door is progressively closing on the old linear model of one-to-many broadcasting, a new and much bigger door is opening on the global content market”

I wonder if this is true?  Whenever there is the whiff of something novel and exciting we are often too quick to dismiss the past as irrelevant. I actually think he’s wrong and that the old linear model of one to many broadcasting may become more important not less.

I think it is true that old fashioned TV has to shuffle round a bit to make way for new media, but I’m sure there is plenty of room at the dining table.

What good old fashioned linear TV can give us is the equivalent of the contrast between TV and cinema. Both are quite different mediums offering a distinctive experience.  I believe that as TV goes high definition there will be plenty of demand for one to many. 

The great big shared experience that TV can offer is a precious thing. There is nothing quite like waiting for the release of a big show or a live event with its accompanying sense of excitement. Remeber the Easternders, everybody's talking about it campaign.  This kind of show is very marketable.

I would like to think that as we move forward we don’t dispense with the past but refine it to those elements which are of permanent value.

See article in  New Media Age

Published by Mark

Mark Waddington is a former BBC broadcaster and producer. He now works for the Diocese of Leeds as Urban Mission Officer. If you would like to get in touch email mark.waddington@leeds.anglican.org

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